Good Reads
Exhibitions
Everyday detritus manifests itself in a variety of ephemeral works in the fantastically unique show, Swept Away: Dust, Ashes, and Dirt in Contemporary Design, now on display at Manhattan’s Museum of Art and Design.
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Losing grunge rock god Kurt Cobain in his prime was a watershed moment for a generation. Now, nearly eighteen years after his death by a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the head in his palatial Seattle home, photographs of Nirvana’s signer/songwriter are on view at the Morrison Hotel Gallery in SoHo.
The first retrospective in 25 years of work by artist Garry Winogrand—renowned photographer of New York City and of American life from the 1950s through the early 1980s —will debut at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) in spring of 2013.
New Photography 2012 presents five artists—Michele Abeles, Birdhead (Ji Weiyu and Song Tao), Anne Collier, Zoe Crosher, Shirana Shahbazi —whose varied techniques and backgrounds represent the diversity and vitality of photography today.
Punctuated by key photographic projects, experimental films, and photobooks, The Shaping of New Visions offers a critical reassessment of photography’s role in the avant-garde and neo-avant-garde movements, and in the development of contemporary artistic practices.
The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) is among several California museums included in the global expansion of Google’s pioneering Art Project, originally launched in February of 2011 and now unveiled in a significantly enhanced platform on Tuesday, April 3.
In conjunction with MoMA’s Cindy Sherman retrospective, the artist has selected films that have informed her artistic practice.
Working dexterously from sources inspired by literature, Old Master paintings, and photographs in popular magazines, Wulff makes paintings inflected by wide-ranging references and in the process builds a surreal universe that moves across time periods.
The Museum of Modern Art’s Performance Program will resume in April with Words in the World, a series of performances and programs that generate a “live” response to the possibilities opened by the relationship between performance and language.
In early 2013, Wolfgang Laib’s Pollen from Hazelnut will inhabit the Museum’s Donald B. and Catherine C. Marron Atrium, infusing the space with a yellow luminosity.
Bastille Metal Works, a premier manufacturer of custom cast zinc and pewter counter tops, range hoods, and furnishings, have created an ornately unique table inspired by the Telfair Museum of Art, the South’s first public art museum.
Regen Projects is pleased to announce a solo exhibition of new works by Elizabeth Peyton. For her sixth show with the gallery, Peyton will show paintings, works on paper, and prints (etching and monotypes).
From the museum that brought visitors the very first interactive multimedia gallery tour back in 2001 comes a new way to explore modern and contemporary art.
The MoMA presents its first time-based artists retrospective with Kraftwerk-Retrospective 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8, performed live on eight consecutive evenings from April 10 through 17, by Kraftwerk, the avant-garde electronic music pioneers.
Parra’s witty, often raunchy work captures attention with its vibrant color, curvaceous lines, and eccentric, distinctive imagery. The largely self-taught artist began his illustration and design career drawing flyers and posters for music venues in Amsterdam in the 1990s;
Ecstatic Alphabets/Heaps of Language is a group exhibition that brings together 12 contemporary artists and artists’ groups working in all mediums including painting, sculpture, film, video, audio, and design, all of whom concentrate on the material qualities of language—visual, aural, and beyond.
Amongst the most common and enduring definitions of design is “problem-solving.” An issue arises.
In a collaborative, chance-based drawing game known as the exquisite corpse, Surrealist artists subjected the human body to distortions and juxtapositions that resulted in fantastic composite figures.
This exhibition, covering the period from 1910 to today, offers a critical reassessment of photography’s role in the avant-garde and neo-avant-garde movements—with a special emphasis on the medium’s relation to Dada, Bauhaus, Surrealism, Constructivism, New Objectivity, Conceptual, and post-Conceptual art—and in the development of contemporary artistic practices.
James Rosenquist designed the eighty-six-foot-long F-111 to wrap around the four walls of the Leo Castelli Gallery, at 4 East Seventy-Seventh Street in Manhattan.
In 1942 Architectural Forum magazine commissioned a group of architects to design projects for a hypothetical postwar American city, rethinking both urban community life and the relationship between architecture and urban planning.
Simon’s project A Living Man Declared Dead and Other Chapters locates the photographic medium’s capacity to at once probe complex narratives in contemporary politics and to organize this material in classification processes characteristic of the archive, a system that connects identity, lineage, history, and memory.
In 1929, art historian Paul J. Sachs presented George Grosz’s Anna Peter (1926–27) to the newly founded Museum of Modern Art, making it the first drawing to enter the collection.
Reinstalled to continue the historical sequence found on MoMA’s fifth (1880–1940) and fourth (1940–1980) floors, the galleries on the second floor will begin with art of the early 1980s and extend to the present moment, interweaving works in all mediums.
Composed of short Super 8 films (transferred to video) that the artist shot over several years, Chronicles eschews narrative in favor of fragmented images that probe the nature of time and assert the permeability of memory.