Good Reads
Maria Hassabi. PLASTIC. Installation view, Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, January 31 – March 1, 2015. Photo by Thomas Poravas.

A major exhibition focusing on Hilaire-Germain-Edgar Degas’s (1834–1917) extraordinary and rarely seen monotypes and their impact on his wider practice, on view March 26 through July 24, 2016.


In the past twenty years, design has branched out in new directions, galvanizing young practitioners, sparking novel business models, and attracting worldwide attention.

Herbert Bayer (American, born Austria, 1900-1985). Things to Come, Herbert Bayer.

Ranging from an armored gauntlet in a First World War poster by Ludwig Hohlwein to glistening talons advertising Japanese nail polish in the 1980s, the disembodied hands in this exhibition salute, menace, manipulate, and caress.

Bill Brandt. London. 1954.

Bill Brandt: Shadow and Light is organized by Sarah Meister, Curator, with Drew Sawyer, Beaumont and Nancy Newhall Curatorial Fellow, Department of Photography.

Frank Lloyd Wright by John Amarantides, 1955.

The Frank Lloyd Wright archives include some 23,000 architectural drawings, 44,000 historical photographs, large-scale presentation models, manuscripts, extensive correspondence and other documents.

Christian Marclay. Installation view of The Clock. 2010.

Winner of the Golden Lion award at the 2011 Venice Biennale, The Clock is a cinematic tour de force that unfolds on the screen in real time through thousands of film excerpts that form a 24-hour montage.

Tetris. Alexei Pajitonov (Russian, born 1955). 1984. Video game. Gift of The Tetris Company, LLC. © 2012 The Tetris Company, LLC.

MoMA has acquired a selection of 14 video games, the seedbed for an initial wish list of about 40 to be acquired in the near future, as well as for a new category of artworks in MoMA’s collection that will grow in the future.


Edvard Munch’s iconic The Scream (1895), among the most celebrated and recognized images in art history, will go on view at The Museum of Modern Art for a period of six months beginning October 24.


The Film Benefit will be highlighted by a special presentation recognizing Tarantino’s acclaimed directorial work, followed by a gala dinner.

Jasper Johns. Flags I. 1973.

This exhibition showcases some 80 prints and artists’ books the Museum has acquired over the past two years, and reveals how an art collection is always a work in progress.

Henry Darger. Untitled (Spangled Blengins). Watercolor and pencil on paper. Gift of the estate in honor of Klaus Biesenbach. © 2011 Kiyoko Lerner / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

The thirteen double-sided drawings represent a wide range of Darger’s practices, and have been carefully selected from the remaining body of exceptionally important work still held by his estate.


The artistic practice of Dieter Roth (Swiss, b. Germany, 1930-1998) encompassed everything from painting and sculpture to film and video, but it is arguably through his editioned work—prints, books, and multiples—that he made his most radical contributions.

Claes Oldenburg (American, born Sweden 1929). Pastry Case, I. 1961-62. Painted plaster sculptures on ceramic plates, metal platter and cups in glass-and-metal case. 20 3/4 x 30 1/8 x 14 3/4″ (52.7 x 76.5 x 37.3 cm).

In the early 1960s, Claes Oldenburg redefined the concept of sculpture. This exhibition offers the most comprehensive overview of Oldenburg’s early career to date, including The Store, the artist’s best-known body of work from this period.


Isa Genzken is arguably one of the most important and influential female sculptor of the past 30 years.

Anne Collier. Cut. 2009. Chromogenic color print, 45 13/16 x 55″ (116.4 x 139.7 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Acquired through the generosity of the Contemporary Arts Council of The Museum of Modern Art. © 2012 Anne Collier, Courtesy Anton Kern Gallery, New York

New Photography 2012 presents five artists—Michele Abeles, Birdhead (Ji Weiyu and Song Tao), Anne Collier, Zoe Crosher, Shirana Shahbazi —whose varied techniques and backgrounds represent the diversity and vitality of photography today.


Punctuated by key photographic projects, experimental films, and photobooks, The Shaping of New Visions offers a critical reassessment of photography’s role in the avant-garde and neo-avant-garde movements, and in the development of contemporary artistic practices.

Guy de Cointet. Five Sisters (1982, remake 2011). Light & sound: Eric Orr. Photo: Sal Kroonenberg. © If I Can’t Dance, Amsterdam. Courtesy Guy de Cointet Estate, Eric Orr Estate.

The Museum of Modern Art’s Performance Program will resume in April with Words in the World, a series of performances and programs that generate a “live” response to the possibilities opened by the relationship between performance and language.

Wolfgang Laib sifting hazelnut pollen, Centre Pompidou, Paris, 1992. Courtesy Sean Kelly Gallery, New York

In early 2013, Wolfgang Laib’s Pollen from Hazelnut will inhabit the Museum’s Donald B. and Catherine C. Marron Atrium, infusing the space with a yellow luminosity.


The MoMA presents its first time-based artists retrospective with Kraftwerk-Retrospective 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8, performed live on eight consecutive evenings from April 10 through 17, by Kraftwerk, the avant-garde electronic music pioneers.


Ecstatic Alphabets/Heaps of Language is a group exhibition that brings together 12 contemporary artists and artists’ groups working in all mediums including painting, sculpture, film, video, audio, and design, all of whom concentrate on the material qualities of language—visual, aural, and beyond.

MoMA New York City

Amongst the most common and enduring definitions of design is “problem-solving.” An issue arises.

Steve Gianakos. She Could Hardly Wait, 1996. Oil and ink on cut-and-pasted printed paper. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. The Judith Rothschild Foundation Contemporary Drawings Collection Gift.

In a collaborative, chance-based drawing game known as the exquisite corpse, Surrealist artists subjected the human body to distortions and juxtapositions that resulted in fantastic composite figures.

Architectural model for WORKac’s Nature-City project for Keizer, Oregon. Photograph courtesy of James Ewing.

The MoMA PS1 is determined to examine new architectural possibilities for American cities and suburbs in the context of the recent foreclosure crisis in the United Stated.

El Lissitzky. Self Portrait. 1924

This exhibition, covering the period from 1910 to today, offers a critical reassessment of photography’s role in the avant-garde and neo-avant-garde movements—with a special emphasis on the medium’s relation to Dada, Bauhaus, Surrealism, Constructivism, New Objectivity, Conceptual, and post-Conceptual art—and in the development of contemporary artistic practices.

James Rosenquist. F-111. 1964-65. Oil on canvas with aluminum, 23 sections.

James Rosenquist designed the eighty-six-foot-long F-111 to wrap around the four walls of the Leo Castelli Gallery, at 4 East Seventy-Seventh Street in Manhattan.