Adrian Wilson

Vincent Castiglia opens his retrospective show at the Sacred Gallery in SoHo, NY tonight. The media are all over him – from the BBC to Reuters, there are a line of TV crews and journalists fascinated by his huge paintings of ” the universal themes of death, sex, birth and decay” as he succinctly puts it each time.

I read about an amazing new camera created from the award winning thesis of a Stanford University supergeek. A photographer who was testing an early prototype compared the resolution to his other point and shoot cameras, but the Lytro was something that never needed to be focused.

Adrian Wilson shares some of his observations from the night and includes tips for architects and interior designers on how to choose a photographer, avoid common pitfalls when dealing with magazines and deadlines, and how to collaborate and work best with other photographers, clients, architects and designers.

The best nights to go out in New York City are without a doubt not the weekends. The best events are usually on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and, as I recently discovered, the first Thursday of the month.

Our advice is to forget buying or renting an apartment and for $4,500 a month you would have the coolest hotel in New York City. Imagine fresh sheets every day, your own maid and no more Time Warner Cable to deal with. Best of all, it has to be worth $150 a night not to have annoying relatives and friends crashing on your couch, eating your food and drinking your beer. Now that’s what I call clever thinking.

The Parsons panel discussion took place yesterday morning downtown at the Milk Studios, hosting truly inspiring people from the fashion industry. Both Adrian Wilson and I (Daniel) went as guests of Parsons as Andrew Rosen (Theory) Jeff Rudes (J Brand) Rogan Gregory, Stephanie Rosenbloom (NY Times Style reporter) and Tommy Hilfiger debate ‘what should we […]

Boogie will blow your mind. The native of Belgrade, Serbia got his start began documenting rebellion and unrest during the civil war that ravaged his country in the 1990s, and the experience seemed to have a profound effect not only on him, but on his work as well. Though Boogie now resides in New York – he arrived in 1998 – all of his work still carries the urgency and thought-provoking depth of a war-torn country.