Marc Jacobs

Marc Jacobs has an idiosyncratic way of looking at women with a spontaneity and fearlessness that pushes boundaries that may not necessarily be everyone’s taste, but still fascinating in execution. His spring 2013 collection was exquisite, a dreamlike nod to the 60’s;

Ruby Jean. Remember that name. “You’re destined for big things little Ruby Jean”. It’s that kind of name, and fitting for the bleach blonde beauty that opened the Marc Jacobs show. It’s possible that her entrance was so picture-perfect, so holistic in mood, so Marc Jacobs at a molecular level that, at least for this editor, the message that would play out for the next seven minutes announced itself entirely in that moment.

The well-established designer is the patron of the Designer of Tomorrow award that encourages and guides young creatives. Marc sees his role as a mentor, someone who offers expertise and assistance, rather than as a critic of their work.

Marc Jacobs is not through with bombast. After a boisterous double-whammy last February and March with his eponymous line and Louis Vuitton, Resort finds Jacobs upping the quirk quotient with a colorful line inspired in part by artist Cindy Sherman’s clown series.

The fashion designer has spent time in rehab for heroin addiction and is now clean. Last year Marc’s business partner Robert Duffy joked Marc used to gorge on cake at that time, laughing he was the only “fat heroin addict” around.

Marc Jacobs says each season of clothes he designs is a natural progression from what went before.Marc Jacobs tries to find a “fresh spirit” to inspire him each season.The fashion designer heads up Louis Vuitton as well as his eponymous label. He has explained how he comes up with so many different collections each year, explaining it’s important that he pays attention to his surroundings.“Well, it’s never calculated. I look for a fresh spirit each season, but you never know what will set you off. When you are in touch with yourself and receptive to new things, that’s really how anyone gets an idea,” he said.Marc was then asked if that meant his Spring/Summer and Fall/Winter collections were complete opposites. He tries not to make that the case, preferring to see them as natural progressions from what went before.“No! For example, the colors for autumn were sober, but the clothes were sensual. For spring, I still wanted that sensuality but was drawn to prettier shades. So you make an adjustment in shape, fabric and proportion, if colors are more joyful. Black buttons become white ones,” he told UK magazine InStyle.

Marc Jacobs is the latest designer to have an exhibition of his work as a central focus in a museum. Jacobs joins an esteemed bunch of designers—the late Alexander McQueen, Jean Paul Gaultier, Madame Grès, the Japanese avant-gardists— who’ve all recently had major exhibitions dedicated to their work.

Flappers. Cowgirls. Industrial factory workers. They all came down Marc Jacobs’ stunningly constructed Edison bulb lit saloon runway at the Lexington Armory. If Jacobs has a knack for one thing in this industry, it’s showmanship. He’s one of the few designers who truly knows how to put on a show and his vision is always holistically considered. With Philip Glass’ 70s opera ‘Einstein on the Beach’ serving as runway music – it was hard to get the show’s pace, and the tune, out of your head once the gold lame curtain closed.

Is Dakota Fanning the new face of Marc Jacobs perfume “Oh Lola”? We sure hope so. And we must admit that it would be a wise move for Marc. Dakota is truly growing to be a beautiful young lady. This photo shoot was Lensed by Juergen Teller. Let her be the new face of Marc […]

Here is the Marc Jacobs Spring 2011 advertising campaign preview, photographed by German fashion photographer Juergen Teller.